Category Archives: listings / stalls

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Juan bing, ECNU Front Gate

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Name: Chinese Style Burito
Specialty (named dish): Juan bing
Location/Area (address or cross-street): across front gate of ECNU
Fixed or Moving: Fixed
Time of Day: 11:00am-9:00pm

Comments:
This streetside food stand serves a variety of street foods out of a storefront. In addition to juanbing, it also serves roujiamou. The filling of the juanbing can be anything from peking duck, fried chicken, charsiew, fried egg, or braised pork. A pancake is dipped in oil the be flash-fried, smeared with hoisin and chili sauce, garnished with lettuce, cucumber, and scallion, then filled with whatever protein you please.

Review:
I have frequented this place twice, both times of which I have decided to not return because the juan bing is too greasy for my liking. The flavors are well balanced from the fresh garnishes and sweet and spicy sauces, however the oil easily coats everything with a greasy flavor that tends to mask the other flavors.

Youyu: ECNU, Front Gate

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Name/Description: Pan-fried squid
Specialty (named dish): youyu
Location/Area (address or cross-street): across front gate of ECNU
Fixed or Moving: Moving
Time of Day: 1:00pm-7:00pm

Comments:
The vendor slices a large piece of squid on a stick and sears it with sauce on a flat top griddle. After sprinkling it with spices, the squid is sliced into smaller, bite sized squares and served inside a styrofoam box with toothpicks for easy sharing.

Review:
I have frequented this stand once, and have not yet tried other squid stands. This stand in particular served a tasty portion of squid that was well-seasoned and cooked perfectly tender.

Takoyaki: ECNU Front Gate

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Name: Takoyaki
Specialty (named dish): Takoyaki
Location/Area (address or cross-street): across front gate of ECNU
Fixed or Moving: Moving
Time of Day: 1:00pm-7:00pm

Comments:
This street food vendor serves mini takoyakis alongside pan-fried MSG tofu. The takoyakis are filled with small pieces of dried scallop and minced shrimp then topped with kewpie mayo and a sprinkle of dried seaweed before being served in a rectangular cardboard box.

Review:
I have frequented this place three times. This is the only takoyaki street stand that I’ve tried; however, compared it to my previous experiences eating this Japanese snack, its fluffy texture is what sets it apart from others. Although it is smaller in size, the dried scallop provides a chewy contrast to the more succulent shrimp. The kewpie mayo provides a creaminess that pairs well with dried nori flakes.

Danping: 111 Yunnan Road

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Name/Description: Egg pancake
Specialty (named dish): Danbing
Location/Area (address or cross-street): 111 Yunnan Road, Huangpu District
Fixed or Moving: Moving
Time of Day: 6:00am-10:00am

Comments:
Located beside a Lawsons, this street stand serves a puffier type of danbing that is smothered in sweet hoisin sauce and fermented soy bean sauce inside. The pancake is savory, crunchy and chewy, with added flavors from the pickled mustard tuber, cilantro and chili sauce. It costs 3.5 yuan for one egg and 5 for two.

Review
The stand is popularly rated on Dianping, with an average of 3.5/5 stars. Reviews state that people are typically always lined up to get their breakfast.

Niu Rou Bao / Sheng Jian Bao / Guotie: Dingxi Lu, Anhua Lu

Name/Description: Fried Beef Bun / Pan-fried Pork Bun / Potsticker
Specialty (named dish): Niu Rou Bao / Sheng Jian Bao / Guotie
Location/Area (address or cross-street): Dingxi Road and Anhua Road
Fixed or Moving: Fixed
Time of Day: 6:00am-4:00pm

Comments:
This vendor sells a variety of handheld snacks from morning till midday out of the windowsill of a hole-in-the-wall. Around noon, this location also begins to sell a variety of sides to rice, still serving the other items on the side until they sell out. The niurou bao costs 2 kuai for one. The sheng jian bao and guotie are sold by fours for 6 kuai.

 Review:
I have frequented this place about 6 or 7 times. This vendor sells the best niu rou bao. Both the niurou bao and shengjian bao are delicious snacks, with the first being more fragrant from the five-spice seasoning and beef. They also have different textures because the entire bun of the niurou bao is fried to a golden crisp. The skin of the guotie is a bit too thick and greasy.

Shaokao: Dingxi Lu, Anhua Lu

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Name/Description: Skewers
Specialty: Shaokao
Location/Area: Dingxi Road and Anhua Road
Fixed or Moving: Fixed
Time of Day: 8:00pm-2:00am

Comments:
This shaokao stand is set up alongside a woman selling malatang in a dingy hole-in-the-wall. Skewers sit on display, still slightly frozen because there is no refrigerator for them to sit in, with one side lined with proteins and seafood and the other lined with tofus and vegetables. A numbered basket is provided to hold customers’ selections. Prices can range from 1 to 8 kuai depending on the skewer.

Review:
I have frequented this place many times before. Compared to other stalls, this one can be oily and over spiced at times, but always well-seasoned. Locals pack the place every night with piles of skewers eaten alongside a beer. Recommended skewers include octopus, tenderized chicken covered in red sauce, sliced baozi, enoki mushrooms, and scallops out of the shell (only sometimes there).

Dianbing: Dingxi Lu, Anhua Lu

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Name/Description: Egg pancake
Specialty (named dish): Danbing
Location/Area (address or cross-street): Anhua Road and Dingxi Road
Fixed or Moving: Moving
Time of Day: 6am-10am

Comments:
This mobile street food stand is set up out of a metal box cart fixed with a flat top griddle and an open front. A man and a woman work together taking orders as the woman works behind the flat top griddle and the man adds the condiments and oil. The eggy crepe is soft and steamy, typically wrapped around a folded piece of youtiao. Each danbing costs 3.5 kuai, and is served out of a small plastic bag.

Review:
I have frequented this place three times. This is the only danbing stand I have tried; but from tasting the dish other times before, I am sure that these vendors have an expertise in the making of danbing. The pancake is soft and steamy, with a kick from the salty, spicy chili sauce that is smeared inside. I find the danbing to be more enjoyable without the youtiao and with an added egg cracked inside because it makes it even fluffier. Locals typically line this street food stand to await their breakfasts.

Baozi: Dingxi Lu, Anhua Lu

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Name/Description : Steamed bun
Specialty (named dish): Baozi
Location/Area (address or cross-street): Dingxi Road, between Anhua Road and Xuanhua Road
Fixed or Moving: Fixed
Time of Day: 6am-6pm

Comments:
This street food stand is perched right outside of a restaurant, selling various types of baozi alongside Shanghai-style shaomai. Each bao costs 1.5 yuan, ranging from sweet (red bean) and savory (braised cabbage, pork, bok choy and tofu, cellophane noodles) fillings. The vegetarian and red bean baozis are recommended favorites.

Review:
 I have frequented this place multiple times as a breakfast or snack in the middle of the day. I believe this baozi stand in particular has a much more pillowy-soft bun in comparison to others, whose baos tend to become thick, dry and gummy. The baos are best eaten during the earlier hours when they are being freshly made. This stand is very popular among locals.

 

Jianbing: Dingxi Lu, Anhua Lu

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Name/Description : Chinese-style crepe
Specialty (named dish): Jianbing
Location/Area (address or cross-street): Dingxi Road, between Anhua Road and Xuanhua Road Fixed or Moving: Moving Time of Day: 6am-10am Comments: Located at the top of the stairs of a cigarette shop, this jianbing breakfast stand is arguably one of the best. The chef responsible for the recipe humbly shells out jianbing with adeptness and speed, working along with a woman who synchronizes along with him to help him crack an egg over each crepe and hand the crepe to the customer immediately after he is finished so that he can begin making the next one before the order is even placed. Each jianbing costs 3.5 kuai with additional cost for a sausage. A youtiao can replace the fried wonton skin inside. The vendor also provides a side of soymilk that can be taken from a small box that is placed beside his stand. Review: I’ve frequent this place at an average of at least once a week. The batter to the crepe at this jianbing stand is much thicker, which creates a thinner layer of pancake when it is spread across the griddle and wiped off. This makes the crepe a bit more crisp at the edges, retaining a soft, slightly chewy crepe towards its center. The wonton skins are much less oily, with a lighter batter that retains its crispiness for longer. The pickled mustard tuber that is sprinkled inside of it has a more subtle saltiness and the fermented soy bean sauce has a hint of sweetness that contrasts the pickles’ flavor. This stand typically has locals lined up throughout the early hours that it is open. – Phoebe Tran Review: We go there three to four times a week for breakfast. It’s much better than the JianBing stands in front of ECNU and the one in the cafeteria because the ingredients are fresher and the sauce tastes better. It is also friendlier because it is a family-run business. It is very popular; there are usually long lines in the morning. Locals and NYU students frequent it. -Annie Xin, Angela Hsiao

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Youtiao + Doujiang: Zhaozhou Lu, Jianguo Lu

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Name/Description (e.g. fried rice stand, xiaolongbao): Chinese cruller + Soymilk
Specialty (named dish): Youtiao + Doujiang
Location/Area (address or cross-street): Zhaozhou Road and Jianguo Xin Road
Fixed or Moving: Fixed
Time of Day: 11pm-3am

Comments:
This street food is not a stand or a hole-in-the-wall. It is located on a street side corner where tables are scattered on the sidewalk and along the street where locals eat and play games of mahjong or cards. A man serves either salty or sweet soy milk out of a bowl before handing it to you to take to your table. You place your order for youtiao, which is communicated to a woman perpendicular to the man rolling out fresh dough and deep-frying it on the spot. Dried pieces of baby shrimp are added to the salty soy milk along with minced pieces of pickled mustard tuber, cilantro, chili oil, and soy sauce. The saltiness causes the soy milk to curdle and turn into something resembling a cross between tofu soup and egg drop soup. Both the sweet and salty douhua pair well with the youtiao.

Review (how many times have you frequented this place?, how does it compare to other stalls making the same dish? How popular is it etc.) I’ve frequented this place three times now, and each time it is packed with locals. The youtiao here is what is truly special and popular among the locals–eaten right away, it is lighter, softer and thinner than most youtiao which are thick and chewy. The place is so popular among locals that they get dropped off by taxi at that street corner just to get in line and wait for their serving.

Mala tang: Dingxi Lu, Anhua Lu

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Specialty (named dish): Mala tang 麻辣汤
Location/Area (address or cross-street): Anhua Road and Dingxi Road
Fixed or Moving: Fixed
Time of Day: 4pm-2am

Comments:
Despite its seemingly unsanitary environment, this hole-in-the-wall is praised by myself and others about its delicious malatang and friendly service. There is indoor and outdoor seating, however the inside of the restaurant can get suffocating at times from the fumes of the skewers. The malatang’s broth is what sets it apart from others–it tastes homemade, with little to no MSG (the woman claims that she adds none to her broth). Flavors become increasingly complex as more vegetables and proteins are added into the broth and cooked together throughout the day. This method of cooking may seem a bit questionable in terms of cleanliness since the broth is only changed once throughout the day; but regardless, it seems to add a punch of flavor that can’t be achieved at other malatang restaurants.

Review: I have been to this resrautant four to five times in total this semester mostly for their barbeque skewers. The skewers taste better than many other food stands and are cheaper. The Ma La Tang is not so good as the ones in malls and restaurants. It has a few tables and chairs outside after 9pm and it is very popular at night.

Review: The sanitation is very low as they use the same brush to put oil to put on the meat and vegetables, and they wipe the baskets containing a client’s ingredients with a dirty towel. However, the balance they create in their seasoning is incomparable as they use cumin, salt, and sichuan chili oil. I strongly recommend the red chicken skewer that uses tenderizer to give it a unique taste. I also enjoy how they use slice their baos open to make seasoned toast.

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Liangpi, Front Gate, ECNU

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Name/Description : Cold Jelly Noodles
Specialty (named dish): Liangpi 凉皮
Location/Area (address or cross-street): across front gate of ECNU
Fixed or Moving: Moving
Time of Day: 4:00pm-8:00pm

 Comments:
A woman sells refreshing bowls of liangpi outside of a glass box decorated with chinese characters on top of a parked tricycle. Each bowl is 6 served in a cardboard bowl with a plastic cap and then placed in a plastic bag to easily take on the go. Customers can choose which noodle they want or a combination of both. One is made from rice flour that has ben steamed into pancakes and sliced into thick noodles, and the other is a thinner noodle that resembles a jelly-like texture. They are then tossed in a bowl with added julienned cucumbers, cilantro, minced pickled mustard tuber, sesame or peanut sauce, vinegar, crushed peanuts, chili oil, and garlic sauce. Customers have the option of choosing their level of preferred heat and whether or not they want to add pieces of wheat gluten for an extra cost.

Thicker noodles are sliced from pre-steamed wheat flour pancakes

Review:
I have been to this stand twice. There is another woman that sets up a liangpi stand right beside her as well, but hers doesn’t use as many ingredients as this stand. The range of garnishes and condiments provides a balance in textures, with crunch from the julienned cucumbers and bean sprouts, nutty flavors from the ground up peanuts and sesame sauce, acidity from the vinegar, and aromatic fragrance from the garlic and cilantro.  – Phoebe Tran

Emily

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Xi’an rou jia mou: Dingxi Lu, Wuyi Lu

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  1. Name/ Description: 西安肉夹馍/ Xī’ān ròu jiā mó
  2. Specialty (named dish): Ròu jiā mó, “meat burger”, “meat sandwich”
  3. Location/Area: Changning District, Dingxi Lu and Wuyi Lu
  4. Fixed or Moving: Moving Cart (make shift table attached to a bike)
  5. Time of Day: Evening
  6. Comments: The server was really nice and very trusting. Most street food stand owners tend to accept money whilst they prepare your food. However, this particular stand owner was trusting enough to allow us to take out own change from his money jar.
  7. Review: First time at this cart and also first time trying this dish. After trying this we definitely would come back or try it at a different cart because the flavor was unique and quite delicious. For only 5 yuan we got a hearty portion of richly spiced pork stuffed between Chinese-styled “pita” bread. We’ve seen this snack in other street food locations before that were popular however this particular stall had few customer. This could be attributed to the time of day (we went at 7 PM) and it’s location.

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