Tag Archives: specialities

Tŭ Sŭn Dòng – Sea Worm Jelly – 土笋冻

 

 

Tu Sun Dong (Chinese: 土笋冻)  is a dish consisting mainly gelatin extracted from boiled sea worms topped with spices and herbs such as cilantro, soy sauce, vinegar, and chili sauce. The literal translation of the name means “earth bamboo shoots, chilled.” These sea worms are commonly harvested in shallow, muddy beaches in the southwestern province of Fujian, China. Prices range from anywhere between five and ten kuai. Although the slimy, smooth texture and physical features of the worm might seem daunting to eat, this protein rich food is known for its ability to strengthen the immune system and ward off the common cold.

Ingredients:
The main ingredients are sipunculid worms and a variety of spices. Most vendors will put strong flavors such as soy sauce, vinegar, and chili sauce to counterbalance the mild, sour flavor of the worms.

Cooking Method:
First, the sipunculid worms are soaked in water to get rid of the excess mud. Then, they are thrown into boiling water. The boiling worms release a gelatin like substance. This gelatin is then poured into small molds. After waiting a period of time to cool, this slightly brown and dull yellow looking gelatin are set in the white carcasses of the worm. Achieving the jelly, smooth texture is a sign of a good Tu Sun Dong. The jelly is then topped with the vendor’s special array of spices and herbs.

History:
Similar to many delicious, impromptu kind of dishes, this delicacy started as a necessity. A military commander with his army in Xiamen ordered his men not to seize any food from the indigenous people. Many soldiers stationed near the beach found a bountiful amount of sea worms. They simply boiled these worms and ate them. Coincidentally, the chilling cold of the winter naturally turned the soup into jelly. A vast majority of the soldiers rather preferred the jelly than the soup and this dish was born.

Possible Variations:
none

Gǎ Ba Cài – Pancake Stripe “Noodles” – 嘎巴菜

Gǎ Ba Cài (嘎巴菜) is a Tianjinese word. After translated into standard Mandarin, it is called Guō Ba Cài (锅巴菜). It is a traditional Tianjin street food which only serves as breakfast. It is so unique that no one can find it anywhere else around the world. Ga Ba Cai looks like short wide green noodles dipped in sticky brown sauce. Ga Ba Cai is salty and with a complex taste from a combination of many different kinds of spices. The “noodle” part is chewy and the “sauce” part is strong and a bit sticky. The “noodle” part is called “Gǎ Ba (嘎巴)”. “Gǎ Ba” is the Tianjinese for “Guō Ba (锅巴)”, which means the “crust” part that is created when rice or paste touches hot metal surface. “Ga Ba” is another way for Tianjinese to say “Jiān Bing (煎饼)” (pancakes). The “sauce” part is called “Lǔ (卤)”, which means the sticky soup-like sauce.

Ingredients:
Rice, Mung Beans, Chopped Scallions, Chopped Ginger, Cut Caraway Pieces, Peanut Oil, Sesame Oil, Aniseed Powder, Ferment Flour Sauce, Soy Sauce, Five Spices Powder, Soda Powder, Starch Solution, Smoked Tofu Slices, Preserved Tofu Sauce, Sesame Sauce Chili Oil and Garlic Chops Dipped in Water, etc..

Gǎ Ba Cài (嘎巴菜) is a Tianjinese word. After translated into standard Mandarin, it is called Guō Ba Cài (锅巴菜). It is a traditional Tianjin street food which only serves as breakfast. It is so unique that no one can find it anywhere else around the world. Ga Ba Cai looks like short wide green noodles dipped in sticky brown sauce. Ga Ba Cai is salty and with a complex taste from a combination of many different kinds of spices. The “noodle” part is chewy and the “sauce” part is strong and a bit sticky. The “noodle” part is called “Gǎ Ba (嘎巴)”. “Gǎ Ba” is the Tianjinese for “Guō Ba (锅巴)”, which means the “crust” part that is created when rice or paste touches hot metal surface. “Ga Ba” is another way for Tianjinese to say “Jiān Bing (煎饼)” (pancakes). The “sauce” part is called “Lǔ (卤)”, which means the sticky soup-like sauce.

Ingredients:
Rice, Mung Beans, Chopped Scallions, Chopped Ginger, Cut Caraway Pieces, Peanut Oil, Sesame Oil, Aniseed Powder, Ferment Flour Sauce, Soy Sauce, Five Spices Powder, Soda Powder, Starch Solution, Smoked Tofu Slices, Preserved Tofu Sauce, Sesame Sauce Chili Oil and Garlic Chops Dipped in Water, etc..

Cooking Methods:
Making “Gǎ Ba”:
The ratio between rice and mung beans should be 1:1. Soak rice and mung beans in water until they are soft, mill them into paste. Get a spoonful of paste and pour it onto a special pan (which is constructed with a flat iron plate and a barrel-shaped stove under it, people use to add coal into the stove). Use a T-shape bamboo pice push the paste a round to form a very thin layer of pancake (Gǎ Ba or Guō Ba or Jiā Bing). Use a metal blade to remove the pancake from the pan. Collect a deck of pancakes, cut them into stripes like bamboo leaves. Lay the pancake stripes aside and let them cool down. Add a bit of flour to them and shake a bit in case they will stick together.
Making “Lǔ”:
Boil peanut oil and add chopped scallions, chopped ginger and caraway pieces until they create a special smell. Add aniseed powder and ferment flour paste and stir fry for a while. Pour in soy sauce until boiled. Add salt water, five spices powder and soda power; boil until boiled. Add starch solution and stir until the whole soup is sticky.
Final Step:
Get a bowl of “Ga Ba”, for the “Lu” in it. Stir a bit and add smoked tofu slices, preserved tofu sauce, chili oil, sesame paste, chopped caraway and chopped garlic in water (the ingredients added varies from stand to stand). Stir again and enjoy.

Tips:
1. Put “Lu” and “Ga Ba” together only when you are about to eat it. Soaking in “Lu” for too long can make “Ga Ba” too soft and lose its chewy texture.
2. Eat “Ga Ba Cai” when it is hot. After it get cold, the “Lu” will change its texture and taste (“Ga Ba” can be cold but “Lu” must be hot).
3. Since “Ga Ba Cai” has a strong and salty taste, most people will have a bowl of soy milk or eat a “Shao Bing” (sesame pancake) with it.

History:
As known, Jian Bing are from Shandong and has been exported to everywhere around China. In addition to wrap vegetables and eat with sauce, some people also soak Jian Bing in water because they are dry. After Jian Bing came into Tianjin, there forms two ways of eating Jian Bing: Jian Bing Guo Zi (fried bread stick wrapped with pancake) and Ga Ba Cai. The earliest and most famous place to eat Ga Ba Cai is Da Fu Lai (大福来), the name means “great luck comes” in Chinese. Ga Ba Cai was created in Qing Dynasty. A man called Zhang Lan managed a Jian Bing stand to earn living. When the emperor Qian Long came to Tianjin, he stopped at Zhang Lan’s stand and ordered some Jian Bing. Because the emperor has never tasted non-royal food, so he became very curious and ate the Jian Bing too fast. Because Jian Bing are dry, so Qian Long was chocked by eating too fast. Zhang Lan turns very nervous and thought the emperor will punish him. At this moment, Zhang Lan’s wife came up with an idea and soaked Jian Bing into a kind of salty soup she just created and gives to her husband to offered to Qian Long. After Qian Long taste it, he was so amazed by the taste and asked who created the dish. Zhang Lan’s wife came out from the back and saluted the Emperor. Qian Long asked her name and it turns out her name is Guo Ba, which is the same sound as the food Guo Ba. Qian Long praised her name and said it just means the “Ga Ba” on a pan. Qian Long decided to name the food after the women and add a character Cài (菜) which means dish and formed a name “Ga Ba Cai”. The day later, Qian Long awarded the couple with a lot of money. The guard who was sent to deliver the money told the couple that their great luck comes. To show their gracefulness, Zhang Lan changed the name of his stand in to Da Fu Lai and changed his Jian Bing stand into Ga Ba Cai stand which sells Ga Ba Cai only. After refined the cooking method, Ga Ba Cai gets very popular in Tianjin.

Related Cuisine:
Tianjingnese Cuisine

Gǎ Ba Cài (嘎巴菜) is a Tianjinese word. After translated into standard Mandarin, it is called Guō Ba Cài (锅巴菜). It is a traditional Tianjin street food which only serves as breakfast. It is so unique that no one can find it anywhere else around the world. Ga Ba Cai looks like short wide green noodles dipped in sticky brown sauce. Ga Ba Cai is salty and with a complex taste from a combination of many different kinds of spices. The “noodle” part is chewy and the “sauce” part is strong and a bit sticky. The “noodle” part is called “Gǎ Ba (嘎巴)”. “Gǎ Ba” is the Tianjinese for “Guō Ba (锅巴)”, which means the “crust” part that is created when rice or paste touches hot metal surface. “Ga Ba” is another way for Tianjinese to say “Jiān Bing (煎饼)” (pancakes). The “sauce” part is called “Lǔ (卤)”, which means the sticky soup-like sauce.

Ingredients:
Rice, Mung Beans, Chopped Scallions, Chopped Ginger, Cut Caraway Pieces, Peanut Oil, Sesame Oil, Aniseed Powder, Ferment Flour Sauce, Soy Sauce, Five Spices Powder, Soda Powder, Starch Solution, Smoked Tofu Slices, Preserved Tofu Sauce, Sesame Sauce Chili Oil and Garlic Chops Dipped in Water, etc..

Cooking Methods:
Making “Gǎ Ba”:
The ratio between rice and mung beans should be 1:1. Soak rice and mung beans in water until they are soft, mill them into paste. Get a spoonful of paste and pour it onto a special pan (which is constructed with a flat iron plate and a barrel-shaped stove under it, people use to add coal into the stove). Use a T-shape bamboo pice push the paste a round to form a very thin layer of pancake (Gǎ Ba or Guō Ba or Jiā Bing). Use a metal blade to remove the pancake from the pan. Collect a deck of pancakes, cut them into stripes like bamboo leaves. Lay the pancake stripes aside and let them cool down. Add a bit of flour to them and shake a bit in case they will stick together.
Making “Lǔ”:
Boil peanut oil and add chopped scallions, chopped ginger and caraway pieces until they create a special smell. Add aniseed powder and ferment flour paste and stir fry for a while. Pour in soy sauce until boiled. Add salt water, five spices powder and soda power; boil until boiled. Add starch solution and stir until the whole soup is sticky.
Final Step:
Get a bowl of “Ga Ba”, for the “Lu” in it. Stir a bit and add smoked tofu slices, preserved tofu sauce, chili oil, sesame paste, chopped caraway and chopped garlic in water (the ingredients added varies from stand to stand). Stir again and enjoy.

Tips:
1. Put “Lu” and “Ga Ba” together only when you are about to eat it. Soaking in “Lu” for too long can make “Ga Ba” too soft and lose its chewy texture.
2. Eat “Ga Ba Cai” when it is hot. After it get cold, the “Lu” will change its texture and taste (“Ga Ba” can be cold but “Lu” must be hot).
3. Since “Ga Ba Cai” has a strong and salty taste, most people will have a bowl of soy milk or eat a “Shao Bing” (sesame pancake) with it.

History:
As known, Jian Bing are from Shandong and has been exported to everywhere around China. In addition to wrap vegetables and eat with sauce, some people also soak Jian Bing in water because they are dry. After Jian Bing came into Tianjin, there forms two ways of eating Jian Bing: Jian Bing Guo Zi (fried bread stick wrapped with pancake) and Ga Ba Cai. The earliest and most famous place to eat Ga Ba Cai is Da Fu Lai (大福来), the name means “great luck comes” in Chinese. Ga Ba Cai was created in Qing Dynasty. A man called Zhang Lan managed a Jian Bing stand to earn living. When the emperor Qian Long came to Tianjin, he stopped at Zhang Lan’s stand and ordered some Jian Bing. Because the emperor has never tasted non-royal food, so he became very curious and ate the Jian Bing too fast. Because Jian Bing are dry, so Qian Long was chocked by eating too fast. Zhang Lan turns very nervous and thought the emperor will punish him. At this moment, Zhang Lan’s wife came up with an idea and soaked Jian Bing into a kind of salty soup she just created and gives to her husband to offered to Qian Long. After Qian Long taste it, he was so amazed by the taste and asked who created the dish. Zhang Lan’s wife came out from the back and saluted the Emperor. Qian Long asked her name and it turns out her name is Guo Ba, which is the same sound as the food Guo Ba. Qian Long praised her name and said it just means the “Ga Ba” on a pan. Qian Long decided to name the food after the women and add a character Cài (菜) which means dish and formed a name “Ga Ba Cai”. The day later, Qian Long awarded the couple with a lot of money. The guard who was sent to deliver the money told the couple that their great luck comes. To show their gracefulness, Zhang Lan changed the name of his stand in to Da Fu Lai and changed his Jian Bing stand into Ga Ba Cai stand which sells Ga Ba Cai only. After refined the cooking method, Ga Ba Cai gets very popular in Tianjin.

Related Cuisine:
Tianjingnese Cuisine
Making “Gǎ Ba”:
The ratio between rice and mung beans should be 1:1. Soak rice and mung beans in water until they are soft, mill them into paste. Get a spoonful of paste and pour it onto a special pan (which is constructed with a flat iron plate and a barrel-shaped stove under it, people use to add coal into the stove). Use a T-shape bamboo pice push the paste a round to form a very thin layer of pancake (Gǎ Ba or Guō Ba or Jiā Bing). Use a metal blade to remove the pancake from the pan. Collect a deck of pancakes, cut them into stripes like bamboo leaves. Lay the pancake stripes aside and let them cool down. Add a bit of flour to them and shake a bit in case they will stick together.
Making “Lǔ”:
Boil peanut oil and add chopped scallions, chopped ginger and caraway pieces until they create a special smell. Add aniseed powder and ferment flour paste and stir fry for a while. Pour in soy sauce until boiled. Add salt water, five spices powder and soda power; boil until boiled. Add starch solution and stir until the whole soup is sticky.
Final Step:
Get a bowl of “Ga Ba”, for the “Lu” in it. Stir a bit and add smoked tofu slices, preserved tofu sauce, chili oil, sesame paste, chopped caraway and chopped garlic in water (the ingredients added varies from stand to stand). Stir again and enjoy.

Tips:
1. Put “Lu” and “Ga Ba” together only when you are about to eat it. Soaking in “Lu” for too long can make “Ga Ba” too soft and lose its chewy texture.
2. Eat “Ga Ba Cai” when it is hot. After it get cold, the “Lu” will change its texture and taste (“Ga Ba” can be cold but “Lu” must be hot).
3. Since “Ga Ba Cai” has a strong and salty taste, most people will have a bowl of soy milk or eat a “Shao Bing” (sesame pancake) with it.

History:
As known, Jian Bing are from Shandong and has been exported to everywhere around China. In addition to wrap vegetables and eat with sauce, some people also soak Jian Bing in water because they are dry. After Jian Bing came into Tianjin, there forms two ways of eating Jian Bing: Jian Bing Guo Zi (fried bread stick wrapped with pancake) and Ga Ba Cai. The earliest and most famous place to eat Ga Ba Cai is Da Fu Lai (大福来), the name means “great luck comes” in Chinese. Ga Ba Cai was created in Qing Dynasty. A man called Zhang Lan managed a Jian Bing stand to earn living. When the emperor Qian Long came to Tianjin, he stopped at Zhang Lan’s stand and ordered some Jian Bing. Because the emperor has never tasted non-royal food, so he became very curious and ate the Jian Bing too fast. Because Jian Bing are dry, so Qian Long was chocked by eating too fast. Zhang Lan turns very nervous and thought the emperor will punish him. At this moment, Zhang Lan’s wife came up with an idea and soaked Jian Bing into a kind of salty soup she just created and gives to her husband to offered to Qian Long. After Qian Long taste it, he was so amazed by the taste and asked who created the dish. Zhang Lan’s wife came out from the back and saluted the Emperor. Qian Long asked her name and it turns out her name is Guo Ba, which is the same sound as the food Guo Ba. Qian Long praised her name and said it just means the “Ga Ba” on a pan. Qian Long decided to name the food after the women and add a character Cài (菜) which means dish and formed a name “Ga Ba Cai”. The day later, Qian Long awarded the couple with a lot of money. The guard who was sent to deliver the money told the couple that their great luck comes. To show their gracefulness, Zhang Lan changed the name of his stand in to Da Fu Lai and changed his Jian Bing stand into Ga Ba Cai stand which sells Ga Ba Cai only. After refined the cooking method, Ga Ba Cai gets very popular in Tianjin.

Related Cuisine:
Tianjingnese Cuisine

Xiao Long Bao – Soup Dumplings – 小笼包

Xiaolongbao (simplified Chinese: 小笼包; traditional Chinese: 小籠包; pinyin: xiǎolóngbāo) is a type of steamed bun or baozi from the Jiangnan region of China, especially Shanghai and Wuxi. It is traditionally steamed in small bamboo baskets, hence the name (xiaolong is literally small steaming basket). Xiaolongbao are often referred to as soup dumplings or simply dumplings in English.[1]

Xiaolongbao are known as siohlon-meudoe[citation needed] /siɔ33lǫ̃44-mø22dɤ⁺44/ in Shanghainese (simplified Chinese: 小笼馒头; traditional Chinese: 小籠饅頭; pinyin: xiǎolóng mántóu). Mantou describes both filled and unfilled buns in northern China, but only describes unfilled buns in southern China.

The characters that make up “xiaolongbao” translate literally to “small”, “steaming basket” and “steamed buns (baozi)”, and the whole term may be literally translated as “little-basket buns”. The appearance of xiaolongbao and jiaozi (dumpling) has meant that the xiaolongbao is sometimes classified as a dumpling outside of China. It is, however, distinct from both steamed and boiled jiaozi in texture and method of production, and is never regarded as a jiaozi (which is more usually translated as dumpling) inside China. As is traditional for buns of various sizes in the Jiangnan region, xiaolongbao are pinched at the top prior to steaming, so the skin has a circular cascade of ripples around the crown, whereas jiaozi are usually made from a round piece of dough folded in half, and pinched along the semicircle. Instead, xiaolongbao is usually regarded as belonging to a whole family of various steamed buns of various sizes sometimes collectively known as tang bao, literally “soup bun”

more/from wikipedia